art

Sportsballs! by Anthony Schmiedeler

Kansas City sports teams have been doing great lately and I've been making stuff to show my support. Some have turned into t-shirts, some into prints, and recently I've even had some picked up to be sold at Made in KC! Here's to keeping the streak alive.

Scraper Bikes by Anthony Schmiedeler

A scraper bike is an ordinary bicycle that has been modified by its owner, typically with decorated spokes with candy-colored pinwheels and matching body and wheel colors, using tinfoil, re-used cardboard, candy wrappers and paint. — Wikipedia

A scraper bike is an ordinary bicycle that has been modified by its owner, typically with decorated spokes with candy-colored pinwheels and matching body and wheel colors, using tinfoil, re-used cardboard, candy wrappers and paint. — Wikipedia

I finally made my very own scraper bike. I need better pictures but this will work for now.

BEFORE (not my actual bike but same make and color)

BEFORE (not my actual bike but same make and color)

AFTER

AFTER

by Anthony Schmiedeler

"If one becomes a lawyer, scholar, mechanist, typist, scientist, production assistant, or what-have-you, the world will commend your decision. Each day at lunch, on vacation, or at whatever party you attend, your choice will be applauded, upheld, and affirmed. And you will know what is expected of you. Even if your job is difficult — if you are a brain chemist, international death merchant, or rocket designer — your responsibilities will be obvious and your goals concrete. If you achieve them, you may be rewarded by promotion. If you fail, you might be fired or demoted, but nonetheless — unless your boss is insane — the job will have tangible parameters. [Art], however, is different. You will never know exactly what you must do, it will never be enough… no matter what change you achieve, you will most likely see no dividend from it. And even after you have achieved greatness, the [tiny number of people] who even noticed will ask, ‘What next?’"

-From the book Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock ‘n’ Roll Group quoted in this Medium post by my favorite author/artist Austin Kleon.

Click Here by Anthony Schmiedeler

Technology obsession has been a recurring theme in a lot of things I make. Not just because I feel like it is a huge problem for people today, but also because I experience it quite a bit myself. I'm made two pieces this week reflecting on that problem. Both made quickly, on a whim, but I felt the need to make them real. The biggest problem with technology is that it get's in the way of people most of the time. I was consciously avoiding that problem to make these things but I only realized after that they both speak to those "technological barriers" to reality.

Impact, by Design by Anthony Schmiedeler

Art vs Design

I’ve been privy to many arguments about the differences between art and graphic design. Some say art is more about expressing emotion and design is a calculated outcome defined by rules. Others say art is all about how a viewer interprets it and design has intended goals. I think there is a lot more overlap than that. A lot of times, art take a rigorously planned out path where as design comes out as a spontaneous gesture. Likewise, a design can be interpreted in many different ways no matter how much effort was put into crafting an obvious conclusion.

Impact vs Aesthetics

Despite their similarities, I do believe that they should be criticized on different scales. The primary focus of good design is to solve a problem. That problem could be as simple as forming an honest representation of a product with a brand or figuring out a comfortable path for readers in the layout of a magazine. Art can at times be used to solve a problem but I would argue that those artworks are designed to do that. So why is it that design isn’t judged on it’s ability to solve problems?

The Beauty in Solutions

In my experience, most graphic design is judged on the way it looks rather than what it does. No matter how much thought is put into function, form seems to win out. This perpetuates those trendy waves that swell and die out year after year. It also seems to cut down on people’s efforts to actually use graphic design for good. In a perfect world design would be judged on impact. Even if that impact is very small or only has the potential to be effective. After all, any design that tries to solve a problem is inherently beautiful no matter what it looks like.